Weekend Road trip around Olympic NP

My friend Nick and I did a road trip around Olympic NP and checked out places I had on my bucket list! Here’s some idea’s and tips for your next road trip.

We left Saturday morning around 9:30 for our first destination.

The famous Vance Creek Bridge

This is the second tallest bridge in Washington State. Spanning 422 feet across and towering 347 feet above the creek below. Walking along this bridge is exhilarating, scary and dangerous.

There are 2 approaches to this bridge. One is right off NF-23 and the other, also longer, is off NF-2341/2199 but requires you to trespass on private property owned by the logging company. We chose the first approach that allowed us to legally hike as far as the bridge but we must stay off. To make sure no one tries climb up  they put barb wire all around the edge and started to disassemble the bridge and tracks, making the climb more difficult but also more dangerous.

After finishing with the bridge, we then, visited different beaches in Olympic National Park, located on the coast.

The Tree of Life

There is an extraordinary tree hanging on for dear life, although, it should have been dead years ago! The tree of life is miraculous! It is located at Kalaloch Beach, near the Kalaloch Campground.


Ruby Beach

I have seen so many amazing pictures from this beach that I’ve been spoiled. It’s very beautiful but in my opinion it’s better to go for a sunset.

There are 2 campgrounds near Kalaloch and Ruby Beach. Kalaloch Campground is open year-round (make sure to reserve a site, especially during the summer) and  South Beach is open from Memorial Day to Late September.

After Ruby Beach we drove to Third beach where we wanted to backpack and camp. For some reason, we decided to go to Second Beach instead. 1.4 mile roundtrip.

Second Beach

Well, our plan for the night changed but it was totally worth it. I saw the most beautiful sunset. The colors of the sky, the clouds, the rock’s shapes and the reflection took my breath away! If you don’t want or can’t camp on the beach, take a flashlight and hike back at night. This is my NUMBER 1 place from this trip so far. It was so amazing to admire the sky full of stars while eating around the fire.

In the morning, we had a cloudy and grey sunrise but it was still pretty anyway. Also, the temperatures are still chilly in April. So, I didn’t sleep well because it was pretty cold and I woke up every couple hours. But it was fun anyway and a nice first experience sleeping on the beach.

We went back to Third Beach around 8:30am. We walked on the beach as far as the waterfall on the left of the beach. It was nice and relaxing but I’m very glad we changed our plan the day before and went to Second Beach instead.

Third Beach



First Beach / La Push

The beach that everyone heard about from the famous movie Twilight. I guess we had to stop and check it out 😎


Rialto Beach

It was the last place we stopped before we headed home. We had time to do more but we were so exhausted from all the driving and the night we had. We were there for about an hour and 30 min. We walked as far as some rocks on the left and had fun walking and climbing around.


Tips:

☑ It’s bear area. Be very cautious and be sure to bring bear spray even if most people don’t. If you camp you will have to bring a bear canister to keep food in. Only bear canisters are authorized and can be rented at any ranger’s station. Hanging your food is not authorized because of the raccoons.

☑ Check the tides on the Olympic National Park’s website. Especially if you go to explore the beach and the tidepools. The best is during low tides and watch for the returning tide to avoid getting trapped by a rising tide.

☑ Wear insect repellent during warm weather.

🏑 Hotel: If you don’t camp, you can use Airbnb and get $40 off for $75 spent on your first stay. Click Here

What else to see?

Well, I already did some of them or just passed for this time but here’s some ideas:

  • Shi Shi Beach
  • Ozette Triangle
  • Cape Flattery
  • Lake Crescent
  • Port Angeles
  • Forks (if you are a fan of twilight πŸ˜‰)

 

 

If you have any questions or if the post was helpful to you

Please leave a comment ✏

Check out my Instagram for more πŸ“Έ

Road Trip #2 : Colorado-South Dakota-Nebraska (August 2016)

days in Colorado, South Dakota and Nebraska

I did this road trip by myself in August 2016. I was a bit stressed and anxious cause it was the first time I travelled alone in National Parks. I planned to camp and backpack every night but I mostly slept in my car because I was too afraid. I will do better next time, though. πŸ˜…

Studio_20170316_075853

HOW MUCH DID IT COST?

I booked the flight and the rental 2 weeks before my trip.

β˜† Flight: $190 from Seattle,WA to Denver,CO

β˜† Rental: $292 for 5 days with Alamo

β˜† Gas: $85

β˜† Ticket for speeding: $145 πŸ˜πŸ˜…

β˜† Backpacking: FREE. One night at Badlands National park, I slept in my car the other nights.

β˜† Food: $110

β˜† Visit:

  • Wind Cave: $12
  • Jewel Cave: $12
  • Mt Rushmore: $10

 

Where did I go?

》》》 There will be a post in more detail about each destination except for Mount Rushmore and Nebraskaγ€Šγ€Šγ€Š

STAY TUNED ✌

 

I landed around 12am in Denver in Colorado, got the car and headed to Wind Cave National Park in South Dakota. It was really hard to stay awake, drive about 6h at night and not sleep at all. My itinerary made me drive a part of Wyoming State where I caught an amazing sunrise before I entered in South Dakota State. 

I arrived at Wind Cave around 8am, walked around and took one of the tours offered by the Park. During the tour, I met a very nice guy named Jacob from Chicago. We shared the trip as far as Badlands, following each other with our own car.

Day 1

Wind Cave National Park

DSC_0170

Then, Jacob and I headed to Jewel Cave around 11 am, which was 30min drive from Wind Cave.

Jewel Cave National Monument

DSC_0290

Finally we drove to Mt Rushmore, which was 45min drive from Jewel Cave.

Mount Rushmore National Monument

Majestic figures of George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt & Abraham Lincoln

This place was why I wanted to go to South Dakota. After a few google searches, I added Wind Cave, Jewel cave and Badlands to my list. We arrived there mid-afternoon and spent about 2h.

The first impressive view of Mt Rushmore was from the Avenue of Flags

DSC_0433-1.jpg

We admired the Mt Rushmore from Grand View Terrace

DSC_0461-1

Took a walk on Nature Trail to Scultor’s studio

DSC_0542-1

And kept going on Presidential Trail that took us very close and almost under the Sculture

DSC_0581-1

Then, we drove around a bit and waited for the night before we went back. It was really cool to see in the dark

DSC_0684.JPG

DSC_0676

We decided to drive as close as possible to Badlands and slept in our car in a rest area about 45min drive from Badlands.

Where to sleep?

β—‡ Camping opportunities are available throughout the surrounding area.

β—‡ Lodging is available in many nearby communities: Keystone (3 miles away), Hill City (13 miles away), Custer (20 miles away) and Rapid City (24 miles away)

You can check out Black Hills and Badlands Tourism Association

Day 2

Badlands National Park

It was an incredible experience. I loved this Park. We did a hike, stopped at some overlooks and did backpacking for the night.

More details in an upcoming blog post 》》》Don’t want to miss it? Subscribe to my blog ❀

Day 3

Nebraska

DSC_0319

It was time to say goodbye to Jacob and keep going toward Rocky Mountain in Colorado. I added a drive in Nebraska at Oglala National Grassland and Scotts Bluff National Monument. This took me almost the entire day. I drove on a dirt road for hours because of Oglala National Grassland. I didn’t see anything special and when the GPS told me I was there, I was actually on someone’s property and had to drive through. Maybe I had a bad experience because the GPS but I didn’t like it.

IMG_2017-03-16_08-17-38

Scotts Bluff was a bit better. It has served as a landmark for peoples from Native Americans to emigrants on the Oregon, California and Mormon Trails to modern travelers. I drove to the summit, checked out North and South overlooks, which took me about an hour.

IMG_2017-03-16_08-16-06

I probably wouldn’t do it again, I would definitely save my time and gas for something else.

Finally, I arrived at Rocky Mountain around 7:30pm, enjoyed the sunset and parked the car at Fall River Visitor Center where I spent 2 nights sleeping in the car.

Day 4 & 5

Rocky Mountain National Park

I spent 2 days hiking as much as I could. I really liked this Park.  In my opinion, 2 days is not enough. I mostly spent my time on the East side of the park.

More details in an upcoming blog post 》》》Don’t want to miss it? Subscribe to my blog ❀

 

If you have any questions or if the post was helpful to you

Please leave a comment ✏

Check out my Instagram for more πŸ“Έ

Yellowstone

The oldest National Parks in the world!

Yellowstone National Park was created in 1872. The park is located in the U.S state of Wyoming. A small part of the park is located in Montana and Idaho. It is known for its wildlife and its many geothermal features. The park contains about half the world’s geysers. Also, you probably know or heard about the Grand Prismatic Spring, which is the largest spring in the park and the 3rd largest spring in the world.

Did you know that Yellowstone National Park is an active super volcano?

You may not see any volcanoes but that’s because much of the entire park is a volcano.



How to get there?

Most people stop by Yellowstone while roadtripping in the USA. They also add Grand Teton National Park to their trip, which is located South of Yellowstone. There are 5 entrance stations but only 2 are open year-round (North and Northeast entrances). Read about access at each station at different times of year on the Yellowstone National Park’s website.

The nearest commercial airlines are located in Cody and Jackson (Wyoming), Bozeman and Billings (Montana) and Idaho Falls (Idaho). They serve round-year. The West Yellowstone airport is serviced from June to early September from Salt Lake City.

Where to sleep?

Camping is the best way to experience Yellowstone. Either inside the park or outside if campgrounds are full. There are 12 campgrounds (over 2,000 campsites) into the park, 5 reservation campgrounds and 7 first-come, first-served campgrounds. Prices range from $15 to $47.75. To make a reservation Click here

Backcountry camping & hiking: Yellowstone has a designated backcountry campsite system, and a Backcountry Use Permit is required for all over night stays. You can obtain your permit at the visitor centers or ranger stations, only in person and no more than 48h in advance of your trip. However, you can reserve your backcountry campsites in advance. For more information, visit Yellowstone National Park’s website.

Lodging: 9 lodging facilities are in the park (more than 2,000 rooms) but only 2 are open in the winter. To make a reservation Click here

What to do?

Depends on the season. Here’s a list of what you can do:

  • Snowmobile & Snowcoach Tours
  • Skiing and Snowshoeing
  • Backcountry camping & hiking
  • Day hiking
  • Bicycling (Spring & Fall)
  • Fishing
  • Boating
  • Wildlife Viewing
  • Guided Tour: a large choice of services are offered. Backpacking, biking, day hiking, boating, fishing, ski and snowshoeing, painting & photography tours
  • Ranger Programs
  • Horseback riding

 

☑ Safety

Yellowstone is a “dangerous” place. Here’s some rules:

β—‡ The animals are wild and should never be approched. Always stay at least 100 yards (91m) away from wolves and bears (carry bear spray), and at least 25 yards (23m) away from all other animals. Bison have injured more people in Yellowstone than any animal and they can sprint 3 times faster than humans can run.

From Lamar Valley

β—‡ Stay on boardwalks and trails in thermal areas. Hot Springs have injured and killed more people in Yellowstone than any other natural feature. You might of heard about the man who died after falling into a scalding hot spring in June 2016.

My experience

It was a road trip from Seattle, which is where I live. It was about 13h drive. My friend Dylan and I spent 5 days at Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Park in June 2016. We didn’t hike that much in Yellowstone. It was mostly a drive from point to another point and walk on the boardwalks to admire geysers, hot springs and mudpots.

North Entrance

How much did it cost?

This trip was pretty cheap. We used my friend’s car, so we didn’t have to rent one. We camped every night, which was about $10-15 per night. We mostly had to pay for food and gas, about $400 for both of us.

Day 1

We arrived a bit after 12 pm and started with Mammoth Hot Springs Terraces. It’s a walk on boardwalks above steaming thermal features. We spent about 1h there.

Then, we drove on Lamar Valley, which is known for its wildlife. This is where I saw a bison for the first time. It was an exciting experience. We saw a bear (very far away), a Pronghorn, a bull moose and other animals.

Lamar Valley

Black bear

Bull moose

After that, we had to drive outside of the park to find a place to sleep because all campsites were full. We found one about 20min drive from the North entrance.

Day 2

We started the day early and stopped at these places:

β—‡ Mammoth Hot Springs Terraces (again) it was a bit different to see in the morning. The steam was more dense probably due to a colder temperature in the morning than in the afternoon.

 β—‡ Norris Geyser Basin: It’s a nice 2.25 miles in the hottest and most changeable thermal area in Yellowstone. We did the whole tour in 2 different areas called Porcelain Basin and Back Basin. It was really impressive and beautiful. Each feature was totally different from all the others. We spent about 1h30 there.

Porcelain Basin
Back Basin

β—‡ Artists Paintpots, which is a 1 mile trail winds through brightly colored mudspots, geysers and steam vents. We spent about 30 min there.

β—‡ Lower Geyser Basin: This is the largest Geyser Basin in Yellowstone. It’s scattered over a fairly large area and features regularly-erupting geysers, hot springs, and a mud pool. We walked on Fountain Paint Pot Nature Trail and saw various hydrothermal features.

》Great Fontain Geyser and White Dome Geyser are located on the Firehole Lake Drive in the Lower Geyser Basin Area. Unfortunately we didn’t have a chance to see them erupt. Predictions are posted at the Old Faithful Visitor Center.

White Dome Geyser

β—‡ Midway Geyser Basin: This is where we could admire the beautiful and famous Grand Prismatic Spring. I went to Yellowstone especially for this place. It was on my bucket list since I saw it online before I came to the U.S.

Also, we saw Excelsior Geyser.  The blue color of the water is incredible and will make you wish you could swim in it but the temperature reaches 199Β°F (93Β°C) πŸ˜±πŸ˜…

We spent about 30min, walking on boardwalks, which is a 0.8 mile heavily trafficked loop trail.

β—‡ Upper Geyser Basin has the highest concentration of geysers in the world and includes Old Faithful Geyser (see below). We only walked on boardwalks of Biscuit Basin. Then, we went to the Visitor Center where the Old Faithful Geyser is located.

 Sapphire Pool at Biscuit Basin
Sapphire Pool

》Old Faithful Geyser is the most famous geyser in the world. It’s a frequent and predictable geyser that erupts once approximately every 45 to 90 min, depending on the duration of the previous eruption, which is about 1.5 to 5min and a height of 110-185 ft. We had a chance to see the eruption. It was really cool.

Finally we spent the night in a campsite outside of the Park about 45min drive from the West Entrance.
This day was breath taking. We saw so much in a day. I had never seen places like this before.

Day 3

Mud Volcano

We stopped by Mud Volcano before we went hiking at Avalanche Peak, which is a short and steep hike, 4.2 mile round trip with 2,100 ft of elevation gain.

It has stunning views of the surrounding peaks and Yellowstone Lake at 10,566 ft elevation.

While the crowd was around the geysers and hot springs, we shared the top with a french couple with who I could speak french with πŸ˜‰ We hung out there about 30 min before we hiked down and drove at Grand Teton National Park ☑ New blog post is coming soon ☑

Other things to see?

Yellowstone National has more than 900 miles of hiking trails. Here’s other places I wanted to see but didn’t have time:

β˜† Grand Canyon of Yellowstone. Uncle Tom’s Trail Hike to Lower Falls

β˜† Yellowstone River

β˜† Mt Washburn: strenuous 6.2 mile round trip, elevation 10,243 feet (3 122m). Stunning views from the summit fire tower.

 

If you have any questions or if the post was helpful to you

Please leave a comment ✏

Check out my Instagram for more πŸ“Έ

Yosemite in Summer

One of my favorite National Parks so far. Either in Summer or in Winter, Yosemite should be on your bucket list

dsc_0935-1

Where should I land ?

FresnoYosemite International  (FAT) or Merced Airport (MCE) : Allow about 2.5 hours to Yosemite Valley

Sacramento International  (SMF) Allow about 4 hours to Yosemite Valley

San Francisco International  (SFO), Oakland International  (OAK) or San JosΓ© International  (SJC) : Allow about 5 hours to Yosemite Valley

What kind of car should I rent ?

Whatever you want. You can rent an economic car because you won’t have to drive on difficult roads. You can rent a Van or an RV but make sure you registered to stay in a campsite.

Where to sleep ?

Camping: In a tent, van or RV, it’s up to you. Reservations are the best way to make sure you have a place, especially during summer. Yosemite is one of the busiest National Parks I have seen. From April to June, the very first-come, first-served might find a campsite. Make your reservation on Recreation.gov or check it out often. If it’s sold out you might find a cancellation in a campground that accepts reservations in or near Yosemite. There are 11 different campsites but only 4 in Yosemite Valley. Camp 4 (tent site only, $6 per night) located at the beginning of Yosemite Fall trail and near Yosemite Valley Lodge. Pines Campgrounds: Lower Pines, Upper Pines and North Pines ($26 / night) located near Half Dome Village.

Backpacking: Free wilderness permits are required year-round for any overnight stay in Yosemite. There is a limited number of people for each trailhead. Reservations are available up to 24 weeks in advance ($5 per confirmed reservation + $5 per person) If it’s something you would like to do, learn more about or make a reservation Click here

Hotel: The hotels closest to Yosemite Valley are the more expensive ones. You will have to drive a bit further if you don’t want to spend more than $100 a night. I usually book with Booking.com

Public Transportation :

A large service of public transportations are available to get to Yosemite or to get around. Amtrak, Greyhound, YARTS, free shuttles… Please check out Yosemite National Park’s website for more information. I only used Yosemite Valley Shuttle, so I won’t be able to help you with the others but I wanted to let you know the possibilities. Below is some information about Yosemite Valley shuttle system:

  • Yosemite Valley Shuttle provides service around eastern Yosemite Valley and operates year-round from 7am to 10pm. It stops at most of the trailheads located into Yosemite Valley, the Pines Campgrounds, Camp 4, Half Dome Village, Visitor Center…

  • El Capitan shuttle stops at El Capitan, Bridaveil Falls, Four Mile trailhead and the Valley Visitor Center. It operates from mid-June through early October from 9am to 5pm.

What to do ?

Yosemite National Park offers various activities

  • Guided Tours: Take a tour at Glacier Point. Overlook with view of Yosemite Valley, Half Dome, Yosemite Falls and Yosemite’s high country. Available when the Glacier Point Road is open, typically late May through October. You don’t have to take the tour, you can drive there on your own. Also, Valley Floor Tour and Tuolumne Meadows Tour are offered. To make a reservation Click here.
  • Hiking: There are so many hiking possibilities. Easy, moderate or streneous. You can find a list with more details on the National Park’s website. For some ideas, check out below in “My experience”
  • Art & Photography: Art class and Photography walks, classes & workshop…
  • Backpacking (wilderness permit required)
  • Biking:  Bicycles are available for rent in Yosemite Valley
  • Birdwatching
  • Fishing
  • Rock Climbing  & Bouldering
  • Stargazing
  • Water activities:  Kayak, Canoe, raft
  • Winter Sports: Cross-country skiing, Snowshoeing, skiing, snowboarding, Snow tubing, sledding and ice skating

 

HALF DOME

The Half Dome is a Yosemite Icon and a great challenge to many hikers. A permit is required to hike to Half Dome.

DSC_1103.JPG

It’s a 14 to 16 mile hike (roundtrip) and you will be gaining elevation for a total of 4,800 ft. This is a very streneous hike and it is not for you if you are out of shape or unprepared. Along the way, you will have a stunning view of Vernal and Nevada falls, Liberty Cap and Half Dome. Most hikers take 10 to 12 hours to make it. The best is to start the earliest possible like before sunrise and have a non-negociable turn-around time if you haven’t reached the top of the Half Dome (3:30 pm the latest).

The most famous and incredible experience of the hike is the ascent up the cables. The 2 metal cables allow hikers to climb the last 400 feet to the summit without rock climbing equipment. Wear good hiking boots and bring gloves for the cables (Some pairs were available before the climb but it’s better to have yours in case they are all taken).

dsc_1111
It’s me πŸ˜€

About the permit:

A maximum of 300 hikers are allowed each day (about 225 day hikers and 75 backpackers). Permits are distributed by lottery via Recreation.gov.

The preseason Lottery runs from March 1 through March 31. 225 permits are available each day. Results in mid-April by email.

The Daily Lottery has approximately 50 permits available. You have to apply 2 days prior to the hiking date.

Fees: Two separate fees are collected. The first fee is charged at the time you submit an application, $4.50 online or $6.50 by phone (per application). Non-refundable. The second fee is $8 per person only when you receive a permit.

For 2017, they are planning on the Half Dome cables being up May 26 through October 10, but these dates could change based on conditions.

HOW TO APPLY: Visit Recreation.gov or call 877-444-6777.

dsc_1194

 

My experience

I went to Yosemite National Park with my friend Hellen in Mid-June. We spent 3 days there. I planned and booked this trip about a month and half before.

How much did it cost ?

β˜† Flight: $150 / pers (From Seattle to Sacramento) Why Sacramento? I considered to land either at San Francisco or Sacramento. The flight was the same price but the rental was cheaper and the drive a bit shorter from Sacramento.

β˜† Rental: $160 insurance included with Enterprise (4 days) / 2 pers

β˜† Gas: $50 / 2 pers

β˜† Hostel: $137 for 3 nights / pers. Yosemite International Hostel at Groveland. We shared the room with 6 other people. Cheap hostel. Was OK for the price. Bed not really comfortable. Kitchen and bathroom shared with about 10 people. Located about 1h drive from Yosemite Valley.

What did we do ?

Day 1

We arrived at Yosemite National Park around 3:30 pm but we were stuck in traffic in the park for about 1h30. When we could finally park the car at Yosemite Valley and start hiking, it was late and we didn’t have time for a long one. We did Mirror Lake, which is an easy, famous and beautiful hike. The entire loop is a 5 mile hike or you can hike to the lake and back, which is 2 miles.

dsc_0516
Mirror Lake

dsc_0611

Then, we stopped and admired Yosemite Fall before we hit the road and checked in at the hostel.

dsc_0842
Yosemite Fall

Day 2

Early morning! I woke up my friend at 5:30am and we drove to Clouds Rest Trailhead, which was 1h30 drive. The trailhead is off Tioga Road. The parking lot is very small and fills up fast. It was already full when we arrived around 7:30 am but we still found a spot. It’s a 14.5 mile hike with 1,775 ft elevation gain (Clouds Rest elevation: 9,926 ft) . Bring enough water because it’s really hot and the hike takes about 8h. This hike is all about the destination but it’s totally worth it. You will have striking views in every direction, including Half Dome. Also, I recommend that you bring a mosquito spray. I got like 50 mosquito bites this day πŸ˜‚πŸ˜£

dsc_0447dsc_0373dsc_0579

Day 3

Woooow! I was so lucky. I won the permit to climb the Half Dome. I tried to get it by applying at the Daily Lottery 2 days before and I got the permit for my friend and myself. It’s probably the hardest hike I have done for now but also the one I’m the most proud about. We started the hike around 7:30 am and I was done at 4:30 pm. On our way, there were 2 amazing waterfalls called Vernal and Nevada Falls. You should definitely include them in your To-do list even if you don’t have the Half Dome permit. It is not required to see them. Also, it’s a BUSY trail. I recommend you to go early if you want to avoid the crowd.

dsc_0959
Vernal Fall
dsc_1030
Nevada Fall

dsc_1004

Two Park Rangers were checking the permit at the base of the subdome, about 1 mile before the cable. I met people walking back upset because they were turned away, so don’t waste your time if you don’t have the permit. They strongly recommend at least 1 gallon of water (4L). I didn’t bring enough (2 quarts/2L) and it was a huge mistake. I ran out of water on my way back and it was a terrible experience. A really nice woman gave me one of her bottles of water and I can tell you, she saved my life. 

dsc_1179-1
At the top of Half Dome

dsc_1148

Getting the permit for the Half Dome changed my plan since I didn’t expect to win it πŸ˜… There were  other hikes I wanted to do and places I wanted to see but I didn’t have time or energy. Here’s a list of what else wanted to do:

  • Bridaveil Fall Trail : 0.5 mile ~ 30min
  • Sentinel Dome : 2.2 mile ~ 1h30
  • Cathedral Lakes : 8 mile ~ 4h
  • Overlooks  : Glacier Point, Washburn Point and Tunnel view (I did Tunnel View during my winter trip)
  • Swimming and rafting at Merced River. You can rent a raft or bring your own. (June & July depending on conditions)

 

dsc_0844

 

If you have any questions or if the post was helpful to you

Please leave a comment ✏

Check out my Instagram for more πŸ“Έ

Horseshoe Bend, Antelope Canyon & Monument Valley

 Horseshoe Bend 

It’s a Horseshoe-shaped meander of the Colorado River located near the town of Page in Northern Arizona and adjacent to the border with Utah. It’s a 1.5 mile hike roundtrip from U.S. Route 89 and leads to the top of a cliff, overlooking Horseshoe Bend and the Colorado River over 1,000 feet below. The trail is accessible to people for all hiking skill levels and takes between 30min and 1h. The trail is made of sand and sandstone. There is no reservation needed. The National Park pass will be required. It might be difficult to park if the place is crowded.

dsc_0113
Trail
dsc_0118
Sunset

Antelope Canyon

It’s a slot canyon located on Navajo land East of Page. A slot canyon is a narrow canyon, formed by the wear of water rushing through rocks. The color of the walls is of a very intense orange. There are 2 different canyons : Lower Antelope Canyon and Upper Antelope Canyon but most of the time people visit the Lower Antelope Canyon.

dsc_0527
Lower Antelope Canyon

Cost : There is a $8 Navajo Park Entrance Fee per person to enter into the indian reserve. You must book a tour, either online or in person. I’ll recommand you to book in advance especially during the summer. Tripods are forbidden. If you want to bring yours you’ll have to take a Photographer Tour.

Upper Antelope Canyon : Approximate prices are $48 for a general tour (1h) and $120 for a Photographer Tour (2h)

Lower Antelope Canyon : Approximate prices are $25 for a general tour (1h15) and $47 for a Photographer Tour (2h15)

Different guided Tours are available. We chose Ken’s Tours to visit the Lower Antelope Canyon (see review below in “my experience”)

You can book a tour for the Upper Antelope Canyon with :

Adventurous Antelope Canyon Photo Tours

Antelope Slot Canyon Tours

Antelope Canyon Tours

Antelope Canyon Najavo Tours

From April to September, do the tour around 11am or 12pm. The sun is at its zenith, and enters the canyon in a spectacular way.

dsc_0376
Lower Antelope Canyon

Monument Valley

It’s located on the Arizona-Utah border. The Valley lies within the range of the Navajo Nation Reservation. It is known by its cluster of vast sandstone buttes, the largest reaching 1,000 ft (300 m) above the valley floor. The most famous buttes are called “West Mitten Butte”, “East Mitten Butte” and “Merrick Butte”. The Navajo people call this place the Valley of Rocks. Monument Valley has stood as a symbol of the American West. No reservation needed. There is a $20 fee to enter into the Park.

dsc_0564
View from the Visitor Center

πŸš— Take a scenic drive : Monument Valley can be visited by driving through a 17 mile dirt road that passes 11 stop points

  1. The Mittens
  2. Elephant Butte
  3. Three sisters
  4. John Ford’s Point
  5. Camel Butte
  6. The Hub
  7. Totem Pole
  8. Sand Springs
  9. Artist’s Point
  10. North Window
  11. The Thumb
dsc_0814
On the dirt road

My experience

We did all of those places in one day. It was a part of the Road Trip we did last year in March/April.

We spent the night at Page and started early, around 6:30am-7am at Horseshoe Bend. In my opinion, it’s better to go in the afternoon because of the shade that cuts half of the Horseshoe-shape. The good thing was we were alone. Also, we stopped there the day before. We caught the sunset after we spent the day at the Grand Canyon.

dsc_0122
Around 7am in April

Then, we went to Antelope Canyon. Our tour was scheduled at 8:30am with Ken’s Tours, which was $28 for a general tour (1h15) + the $8 Navajo Park Entrance Fee.

Review : 4.5/5. We entered into the canyon by group of about 12 people and a guide. The guide was very nice and provided us a verbal tour and assistance in taking photos. I got my camera a few weeks before the trip (Nikon D3300) and he helped me with the settings, making my pictures look better 😍 Also, he offered to take a panaromic picture of us with our phone. When we came out of the canyon he showed us some actual “Prehistoric Dinosaur’s paw prints”.

dsc_0397

Finally, we drove to Monument Valley, which is about 2h drive (120 mile) from Antelope Canyon and spent the afternoon there. We had a great view of Monument Valley from the Visitor Center. Then we hiked The Wildcat Trail, which is 3.2 miles around the West Mitten Butte. It takes about 1h30-2h. We really enjoyed this hike. We drove through the park on a 17 mile dirt road. We had an economic car and it was totally doable to drive on the dirt road (the road was dry). We left around 5pm and went back to Page for the night.

img_2017-02-25_07-19-40

If you have any questions or if the post was helpful to you

Please leave a comment ✏

Bryce CanyonΒ 

 

Bryce Canyon and its famous hoodoos

Bryce Canyon is an American National Park located in Southwesthern Utah. It is known for its incredible Hoodoos (odd-shaped pillars of rock left standing from the forces of erosion) and it is the largest collection of Hoodoos in the world!

dsc_0715

Getting to Bryce Canyon :

The closest major airports are in Salt Lake City (Utah) located 260 miles North of the park and Las Vegas (Nevada) located 270 miles Southwest of the park.

Getting around in the Park :

All roads are paved inside the park so don’t worry about needing a certain car. There is snow during winter but the Park plows and sands the road after heavy snowstorms. Some roads may be temporarily closed due to icy winter conditions. The park is open year-around.

The Park offers free shuttle that takes visitor to the Park’s most popular viewpoints, trails and facilities.

DSC_0150-1-1.jpg

Where to sleep ?

Campground : $20/per tent-site/per night and $30/per RV-Site/per night. Reservations can be made by phone or online from 6 months to 2 days in advance.

  • Sunset Campground : 100 sites. 20 tent-only sites and 80 RV & tent sites (first-come, first-served) and 1 Group site (available by reservation) CLOSED from mid-October through mid-April. This campground is closest to the best hiking trail which begins and ends at Sunset Point
  • North Campground : 99 sites. 13 RV sites (by reservation) and 86 RV & tent sites (first-come, first-served). At least one loop is open year-round.

Backcountry camping : Permits are required for all overnight stays ($5/person). You can purchase the permit at the Visitor Center. Reservations may be made up only 48h in advance, and only at the Visitor Center. There are 8 campsites on the 22.9 miles Under-the-Rim Trail and 4 campsites on the 8.8 miles Riggs Spring Loop Trail.

Lodging : Bryce Canyon Lodge. Open late March through early November. Reservations by phone or online.

What to do ?

  • RANGER PROGRAMS
  1. Geology talks (year-round)
  2. Rim Walk (Spring, Summer & Fall)
  3. Kids Programs (Summer)
  4. Evening Programs (Summer & Fall)
  5. Full Moon Hikes (Full Moon nights)
  6. Astronomy Programs
  7. Snowshoe Hikes (Winter)
  • Hiking : Easy, Moderate, Strenuous
  • Backcountry hiking (Backcountry Camping permit required)
  • Private Horse & Mule Riding (April 1 – October 31)
  • Drive the scenic overlook

bryce-canyon-amphitheater-map.jpg

My experience

Bryce Canyon was one of the places we visited during the ROAD TRIP we did last year in March/April.

We spent one full day there. It was totally breath taking. The hoodoos are so beautiful. The colors red and orange are really amazing. The pictures don’t do it justice!

dsc_0727

We started with 2h of horse/mule riding. It was really fun and not too expensive ($65/pers). We got a picture of us by a photographer for $10 each. It’s a special way to explore Bryce Canyon because this trail allows horse only. You can book your tour online with Canyon Rides.

img_2017-02-21_07-24-31

After that we started at Sunset Point and hiked down a part of Navajo Loop Trail (1.3 mile roundtrip). We reached Queens Garden Trail (1.8 mile roundtrip) at the bottom and finished at Sunrise Point. It was a short and easy/moderate hike, like a loop, that goes down into Bryce Amphitheater. It took us about 2h. I really liked it. It was amazing to hike between the hoodoos. Then, we walked Rim trail between Sunrise Point and Sunset Point to join our car (1 mile). It’s an amazing view from the top.

img_2017-02-21_07-42-36
Navajo Loop Trail
img_2017-02-21_07-33-16
Queens Garden Trail

We did Mossy Cave Trail (.8 mile round trip) easy hike that leads to a mossy overhang and small waterfall. We wanted to see the waterfall but I was not aware that the waterfall flows from May to October πŸ˜… This trail is located outside of the park on Hwy 12 going toward Tropic.

dsc_0056

Finally, we did a part of Fairy Land Loop Trail as far as Tower Bridge (3 mile roundtrip) just before night and kept going on our road trip toward Zion Canyon, which I’ll write about later because I’m going back there in June and I’ll have so much more to say about it 😎

img_2017-02-21_07-50-12
Pictures at the bottom are taken at the top of Tower Bridge

I think 1 day is a little bit too short to fully enjoy Bryce Canyon. If you can, you should spend 2 days and camp into the park or stay at the lodge.

If you have any questions or if the post was helpful to you

Please leave a comment ✏

San Diego

3 days in San Diego 🌞

San Diego is a major city in California located on the coast of the Pacific Ocean in Southern California and adjacent to the border with Mexico.

Sunrise at Ocean Beach

Ps : I apologize for the pitures’s quality. I had a compact camera and IPhone 4 only 😐

 

I travelled to San Diego by myself in February 2016 and I spent 3 days there. I planned my trip 2 weeks before (cause you never know when you will be off πŸ˜€) and I flew from Seattle.

Budget :

  • Flight : $330
  • Hostel : $129 for 4 nights
  • Rental car : About $190 for 2 days (very disappointed by the rental company)
  • Gas : $20
  • Tijuana in Mexico : $48 for an half day (via Viator)
  • Horse Riding : $135/pers for a group tour/ $150 for a private tour
  • Hike : $6
  • Food : $40

 

Hostel : USA HOSTELS OCEAN BEACH 😁

15 min drive from the airport. 2min walk from the beach. I loved this hostel. I shared my room with 5 other people and I made a friend from Australia. This is why I like Hostels, it’s easy to meet people and very cheap. The breakfast was included (cereals, oatmeal, fruit, tea, coffee, bread, jam…). During breakfast, you can meet new people as well. Rooms, kitchen and bathrooms were very clean. The staff was very nice and friendly and offered activities nightly, like bonfire at the beach with smores or go out to the club. The hostel also offered easy access to the Zoo, Downtown, SeaWorld and La Jolla via free shuttle.

Rental car : Payless 😑

I was so disappointed 😑 I booked a car for $85 for 2 days via Rentalcar.com. When I arrived at the rental company she told me I had to take the insurance which was about $70 (First and last time I heard that). I didn’t want to take it but for some reasons she didn’t let me get the car without the insurance. I cancelled my reservation and went to Hertz. They refused my international driving license because they wanted my french driving license. I didn’t understand that. I really needed the car so I went back to Payless because the other companies were too expensive. I had to pay $190 if I wanted to get the car.  With my reservation “cancelled” they considered me like a last minute booking, so it was even more expensive. But since then It’s been so much easier to rent a car since I got my US drivers license.

First day

Early hike at Torrey Pines State Reserve and snack at La Jolla beach with Gustavo, who I met on couchsurfing. Don’t be shy at Torrey Pines, it’s not unsual to see people walk naked on the beach. Feel free to participate. LOL!

Then, I did the Tijuana Tour via Viator. It was cheap and the bus driver was nice but I didn’t really like it. I spent 3h on the same street in Tijuana and I was very uncomfortable and sometimes felt unsafe by the way guys were looking at me. Gustavo, who comes from Mexico and knows Tijuana well made fun of me the next day when we met again. He said sorry I forgot to tell you that you shouldn’t wear shorts! So girls, stay covered up! Haha! BUT the tacos were good and cheap. I ate them from a deck on the second floor and watched the people in the market walking around.

Then when I went back to San Diego, I hung out with Atylla who I also met on couchsurfing. Got some drinks and dance at the bar.

Second day

I went for a hike by myself about 1h drive from San Diego. It’s called Cedar Creek Falls to Devil’s Punchbowl. I didn’t know I needed a permit but fortunately Atylla told me the day before and I could get the permit at the last minute for $6. It was a really nice 6 mile hike that leads to the waterfalls. The water was cold but refreshing. You can jump in from an awesome rock. I really had fun but it can be crowed even during the weekday. It was busy so the permit was sold out when I arrived at the parking lot. Keep in mind, when I went, a ranger was there checking permits.

Then, I walked into Balboa Park which is a famous park in San Diego. It was very beautiful and relaxing.

Finally, I caught the sunset at Ocean beach before I went back to the hostel.

Third day

I fullfilled one of my dreams, which is to ride a horse on the beach! I booked the tour online with “San Diego Beach Rides” which is a 30min drive from Ocean Beach. I was alone for the tour (3h) and they usually don’t gallop but we did πŸ˜ƒπŸ‡ It was an incredible experience.

Then I went to Coronado Island and had lunch on the beach. It was nice to take a break and relax 😎

I made a stop at the Old Town and walked around into the market. Nothing crazy but I loved it. Also, it was Tacos Tuesday so I spoiled myself with Tacos and a margueritta 🍹

After, I went back to the hostel for the bonfire and smores with the other travellers on the beach. I met this nice Australian girl and offered her to come with me to see the Embracing Peace and USS Midway at night, which she agreed and we had fun. Then I went back there in the morning before I flew home.

Other things to do or see ?

  • Sea World
  • San Diego Zoo Safari Park
  • Seaport Village
  • Historic Gaslamp Quarter in downtown
  • Point Loma
  • Cabrillo National Monument
  • Sunset Cliffs Natural Park (Look for the cave)
  • Surf (or at least try to)
  • Whale watching
  • Catch a game
  • Flower field (mid-March through mid-April)

 

If you have any questions or if the post was helpful to you

Please leave a comment ✏

Death ValleyΒ 

Death Valley

La VallΓ©e de la Mort in french

dsc_0599

Death Valley is a desert valley located in Eastern California near the border of Nevada. It’s one of the hottest places in the world at the height of summertime.

img_20170215_064019

 

When to go ?

The best time to hike in Death Valley is from November through March due to the very high temperatures in the park. Summers are extremely hot and dry. Daytime may exceed 120Β°F / 49Β°C.

Where to land ?

The closest airport is Las Vegas. About 2h30 drive. It’s almost 5h drive from Los Angeles.

What kind of car should I rent ?

We rented an economic car and we could easily drive on the unpaved road of Twenty Mule Team Canyon. Some people were more original… 😎

dsc_0124

It doesn’t mean you can drive everywhere with an economic car. Farabee’s Jeep Rental now have an outlet located in Furnace Creek. These jeeps are outfitted for rugged backcountry road use.

Where to sleep ?

Camping : There are 9 different campgrounds. They are all first-come/first-served except for Furnace Creek campground. Reservations are available for the camping season of October 15 to April 15 by phone or online. Acording to the National Park’s website, it’s very rare for all campgrounds to fill. Prices : From free to $22

Backcountry camping : The backcountry permit (free) may be obtained at the visitor center or any ranger station. Check out the National Park’s website or directly with a ranger to see where the backcountry camping is not allowed.

Lodging : Reservations online

Hotel or RV campground : Outside of the park (Amargosa, Pahrump, Beatty)

What to do ?

  • Wildlife watching : Death Valley’s great range of elevations and habitats support a variety of wildlife species, including 51 species of native mammals, 307 species of birds, 36 species of reptiles, 3 species of amphibians and 5 species and 1 subspecies of native fishes
  • Hiking : easy, moderate or difficult. It’s up to you πŸ˜‰ you can find some ideas below in “my experience” or check out the National Park’s website for more.
  • Backpacking (must obtain a free backcountry permit)
  • Biking & Mountain Biking : Death Valley has more than 785 miles of roads including hundreds of miles suitable for Mountain Biking

dsc_0338

My experience

My best friend and I went to Death Valley at the end of March. We did a road trip from Las Vegas to Los Angeles and drove from L.A to Death Valley. We had a great time. But a bit scary when we got caught in two sands storms! Once while driving and the next while we were outside of the car taking pictures. Then we almost ran out of gas as we entered the park. Lucky there was a gas station close although gas tends to be much more expensive close to the park.

We booked a night in a really nice RV for $52 at Pahrump (Booking.com) which is about a 1h drive from Furnace Creek Visitor Center.

All in all, it was a great trip. It’s very nice to drive through Death Valley National Park, I love the desert. It’s incredible how the scenery can be totally different from one place to another.

img_2017-02-10_23-36-52

What did we do ?

First day (Half day)

img_2017-02-10_23-24-28
White Gold
img_2017-02-10_23-23-01
Badwater Bassin : Surreal landscape of vast salt flats. 1 mile
img_2017-02-15_00-31-07
Natural Bridge : 1 mile

 

Second day

img_2017-02-15_06-22-49
Zabriskie Point : The most popular viewpoint in the park
img_2017-02-10_23-20-39
Mosaic Canyon
img_2017-02-15_01-03-14
Mesquite Flat Sand Dunes : The largest dune field in the park. 2 mile
img_2017-02-15_01-09-05
Salt Creek Interpretive Trail : 0.5 mile
img_2017-02-10_23-18-35
Golden Canyon Interpretive Trail : 3 mile
img_2017-02-15_01-08-16
Twenty Mule Team Canyon : 2.7 mile one way loop drive (unpaved)

 

There are other places that you should check out if you have time :

  • Dante’s View : At 5,475 ft, the most breathtaking viewpoint in the park.
  • Devil’s Golf Course : An immense area of rock eroded by wind and rain into jagged spires (unpaved access road).
  • Artist’s Drive : A 9 miles scenic loop drive. This road is one-way and is only drivable with vehicles less than 25ft in total length.

 

Other things to see ?

Death Valley National Park has over 5,300 square miles of desert and mountains, making it the largest national park in the contiguous United States. The possibilities for discovery are ENDLESS!

If you have any questions or if the post was helpful to you

Please leave a comment ✏

Grand CanyonΒ 

The most famous and spectacular

National Park in the USA

dsc_0852

 

Where should I land ?

Either Las Vegas or Phoenix.

From Las Vegas to the South Rim, it’s 4h15 drive if you use Google maps but you should round up to 5h to be safe. If you have time, you should definitely stop by Eldorado Canyon Mine Tours located just 45min from Las Vegas. It’s the oldest, richest and most famous gold mine in Southern Nevada. You can do the historic Mine tours ($12.50 for an adult / 1h10) or just walk around like we did. It’s very cool.

Eldorado Canyon Mine Tours

It’s faster from Phoenix with a 3h30 drive when using Google maps, but consider 4h to be safe.

What kind of car should I rent ?

Whatever you want. You can rent an economic car cause you won’t have to drive on difficult roads. If your group is more than 2 or 3 people, you should rent a van or a RV. It’s fun to go for road tripping and you can sleep in it.

Where to sleep ?

Depends on if you prefer adventure or comfort and your budget. Sleeping in the National Park’s Lodges is expensive (prices start at $100). I will recommend Flagstaff which is 1h30 from the South Rim. Or you can camp in the park. The most popular Campground is called Mather Campground ($18/night), you have to make a reservation and if you plan to go in the summer you should make it as early as possible. If it’s already full you can sleep at Desert View Campground which is first-come, first-served.

If you wish to camp anywhere in the park other than in developed Campgrounds, you must obtain a backcountry permit. You have to submit the permit request form either by fax or by mail. Permit requests are not accepted by telephone or by email. APPLY AS EARLY AS YOU CAN!!! (About 4 months before)

South Rim or North Rim ?

The South Rim is the most popular and visited and it’s accessible year around. The North Rim is closed for the winter through May 15 for the 2017 season.

dsc_0985
Moran Point

dsc_0848
From Bright Angel Trail

Transportation inside the Park :

You can park your car at different places and take the Shuttle (Refer to the map). The shuttles cover most of the park but you will have to take your car on the Desert View Drive that leads to Desert View Watchtower and the Campground. Many overlooks along the way.

What to do ?

Many activities are possible :

Guided Tours :

  • South Rim Bus Tours
  • Bicycle Rentals and Guided Bicycle Tours – South Rim
  • Mule Trips – North and South Rim
  • Guided hikes with a Park Ranger (Free) – North and South Rim
  • Raft Trips
  • Air Tours
  • Jeep and Van Tours

Hiking :

Many options are available for day hikers. The South Rim and the North Rim offer Rim Trail Hikes that have spectacular views. Or you can choose to day hike into the Canyon. The most popular hikes on the South Rim are Bright Angel Trail and South Kaibab Trail.

Hiking into the Canyon can be very dangerous (Falls, heat stroke, dehydratation). Over 250 people are rescued from the Canyon each year. Be prepared for a safe and enjoyable hike. Bring enough water and enough food. Don’t underestimate the wilderness and overestimate your own abilities. Wear comfortable hiking boots.

dsc_0688
Bright Angel Trail 

Havasu Falls

One of the most beautiful, amazing, incredible blue green waterfalls. Hidden in the Grand Canyon and DIFFICULT (almost impossible) to get reservations for. The Havasupai Tribe administers the land, which lies outside the boundary and jurisdiction of Grand Canyon National Park.

Campground reservations started on February 1st and were only taken by phone. It was impossible to get someone on the phone, all lines were busy. The ones who where lucky to make a reservation spent their entire day calling multiple times. For what I know, the Campground is already full for the 2017 season.

It requires a 10 mile hike EACH WAY to the waterfalls of Havasupai. NO DAY HIKING ALLOWED. You must obtain a reservation and permit or they will turn you away. Also, it can be very dangerous to attempt this hike in one day. Temperatures can reach 115Β°F (46Β°C)

Cost :

  • Entry Fee : $50 per person + 10% tax
  • Campground (300 sites) : $25/person/night + 10% tax
  • Environmental fee : $10 + 10% tax

 

NOT MY PICTURE

My experience

I went to the Grand Canyon (South Rim) twice and I’m planning to go again in June. Both times I landed in Las Vegas and made a stop at Eldorado Canyon Mine Tour.

The first time was in December 2015 with my best friend Bruna. We planned to stay 2 days, drive at each overlook and do at least one hike into the Canyon. I pictured the Grand Canyon always warm and sunny. What a surprise! It was COLD and SNOWY! When we arrived on the afternoon, we were totally exhausted after a crazy night in Las Vegas and 5h drive. So we decided to drive from the Visitor Center to Grand View Point and stop at each overlook. The first time in the Grand Canyon is magical and totally breath taking. We were so excited and couldn’t believe our eyes. A DREAM CAME TRUE ❀ We spent the night at a couchsurfer’s place inside the park. We planned to stay 2 nights there but it was very uncomfortable to sleep because (funny story) the very nice guy who welcomed us snored TOO LOUD πŸ˜…  We were too exhausted and wanted to find another place for the second night. Finally the 2nd day was snowy and foggy like crazy. No view of the canyon. So we decided to make a snowman β˜ƒ and we spent the night at Flagstaff. We drove on a part of the famous Route 66 on our way back to Las Vegas and found a nice and weird town.

Route 66

The second time was in March 2016 with my boyfriend. This time the weather was way better. Cold at night but warm during the day. We started early in the morning and walked part of the South Rim Trail from Bright Angel Lodge to Mojave Point. Then we did some of Bright Angel Trail (6 miles out and back). We were done around 4pm, stopped at some overlooks on Desert View drive and headed to Page where we caught the sunset at Horseshoe Bend.

dsc_0003

I just requested the Backcountry permit for Bright Angel Campground in June 2017. This time I want to do backpacking and sleep in the canyon. Hope I get the permit. FINGERS CROSSED πŸ€

dsc_0784-1

If you have any questions or if the post was helpful to you

Please leave a comment ✏

Road Trip #1 : California-Nevada-Arizona-Utah (March/April 2016)

A Road Trip is an amazing way to discover a country and especially in the USA. The scenery is just breath taking. It’s like a show from your car. Also, you better like driving cause you are going to drive for long hours and some roads are straight and endless. There are so many different Road trips you can do. Depends on how many days or weeks and what you want to see. Here are some ideas… πŸš—

dsc_0056-1-1

 

9 DAYS – 2 PARTS

For some reason my best friend Bruna couldn’t make the entire road trip with me. My boyfriend decided to join me for the second half. This is why I chose to land in Las Vegas. Otherwise a start in Los Angeles would have been the best. I spent 4 days with Bruna in Nevada and California and 5 days with my boyfriend in Nevada, Arizona and Utah.

2017-02-09_05-56-43

HOW MUCH DID IT COST ?

β˜† Flight : $340 / pers (from Seattle)

β˜† Rental : $290 (Enterprise) / 3 pers

β˜† Gas : About $225 (~2000 miles) / 3 pers

β˜† Hotel : $300

  • 2 nights = Couchsurfing = FREE
  • 1 night = RV = $52 / 2 pers
  • 5 nights = Hotel = $248 / 2 pers

β˜† Visit :

  • $86 Universal Studio Los Angeles (Cheaper online) / pers
  • $80 National Parks Annual Pass
  • $20 Monument Valley
  • $28 Antelope Canyon / pers
  • $65 Canyon Trail Rides Bryce Canyon (Horse ride) / pers

 

I planned and booked everything about a month before. The earlier you book, the cheaper you will pay. You definitely can find a flight for Las Vegas for less. If you are under 25, you will pay more for the rental because of the insurance. It’s also more expensive if you drop the car off in a different place than where you picked it up. I usually book my flight with Kayak, the car with Rentalcar.com and the hotel with Booking. 

I like to use Couchsurfing when I’m travelling in the City, either for the night or just to hang out. It’s a nice way to meet people, share culture and whatever you like, and you have someone to show you around or give advice about where to go. Usually, you’ve already researched online what you want to do and what you want to see but they can advise you about places less touristic.

 

THERE WILL BE A POST IN MORE DETAIL ABOUT EACH DESTINATION

 

Los Angeles

fb_img_1486620799697
Griffith Observatory, Los Angeles

Death Valley

dsc_0653
Zabriskie Point, Death Valley

Click here to read the Death Valley blog

Grand Canyon

dsc_0012
South Rim, Grand Canyon

Click here to read the Grand Canyon blog 

Horseshoe Bend

dsc_0118
Sunset, Horseshoe Bend

Antelope Canyon

DSC_0376.JPG

Monument Valley

dsc_0564

Click here to read about the Horseshoe Bend, Antelope Canyon & Monument Valley Blog 

Grand Staircase Escalante

dsc_0106
Spooky Gulch, Grand Staircase Escalante

 Bryce Canyon

dsc_0715

Click here to read about the Bryce Canyon blog

Zion

dsc_0464
From Angels Landing Trail, Zion

 

πŸš— Have fun and Drive safe πŸš—

If you have any questions or if the post was helpful to you

Please leave a comment ✏